July 22, 2014

todaysdocument:

The Battle of Atlanta occurred 150 years ago on July 22, 1864. Fought on the outskirts of the city between Union forces under Major General William T. Sherman and Confederates under General John Bell Hood, the battle preceded a siege after which Atlanta would fall to the Union.

Georgia, Atlanta Battlefield, July 22, 1864, ca. 1862 - ca. 1865. From the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865

Georgia, Atlanta Battlefield, July 22, 1864, ca. 1862 - ca. 1865. From the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865

Battlefield of Atlanta, 1864, July 22, where Gen. McPherson was killed, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865. From the series: Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes

July 22, 2014

laughingsquid:

‘Lessons Learned’, A Live-Action Puppet Film Directed by the Man That Played the Baby in Jim Henson’s ‘Labyrinth’

July 22, 2014
Irene #1, Comic Anthology Edited by Dakota McFadzean, Andy Warner and DW - Buy Indie Comics Online

irenecomics:

Irene 1 and Irene 2 are sold out. Get the bigger and badder Irene 3 or Irene 4!

(via dakotamcfadzean)

July 22, 2014

npr:

What ‘The Golden Girls’ Taught Us About AIDS" via Barbara Fletcher

"But this is what The Golden Girls was so good at: bringing home those topics that often made people uncomfortable — racism, homosexuality, older female sexuality, sexual harassment, the homeless, addiction, marriage equality and more — and showing us how interconnected and utterly human we all are at any age. Served, of course, with that delicious trademark humor that infused the show throughout its groundbreaking, taboo-busting seven-season run.”

Oh Bea.

July 22, 2014

amnhnyc:

Happy birthday to Vera Rubin! The pioneering astronomer turns 86 today. 

Learn about her career and contribution to the discovery of dark matter in this profile, and in our Dark Matter explainer video

July 22, 2014

yourcorpseisbeautiful:

cheese3d:

i think i can accurately say that i can crush a man’s head with my thighs

Bad ass bitch.

(via surprisinglyquitesane)

July 22, 2014

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

O.o

Psychology… The gateway study of all mad science

(via npr)

July 22, 2014

iguanamouth:

youre gonna look so godamn cool

Fuck leaving a pretty corpse. We should all be bad ass demon fighting skele;warriors.

(via l1ttlebulldozer)

July 22, 2014
nprfreshair:

Arthur Allen's book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl, tells the story of two scientists—one Christian and one Jewish—who battled typhus and sabotaged the Nazis during WWII. 
Transmitted by body lice, typhus killed untold numbers of soldiers and civilians during the war. Today’s interview explores the labor-intensive process of making the vaccine and the way the lab sabotaged the Nazis by weakening their vaccines and sneaking doses into Jewish ghettos. 
Allen explains how the Nazis used lice imagery after they invaded Poland: 

"The Nazis … always described the Jews as "vermin" and sometimes used the word "lice." …And this was an ideology that was belittling and obviously also associating Jews with sort of filth and contamination, parasitism — all of these things that you metaphorically can link lice to.
[The Nazis] made it very concrete after they took over the first Polish cities, that there were signs that went up all over Warsaw, for example … that would have a picture of a bearded Jew with a louse that said, “Lice, Jews, typhus,” to make that association in the minds [of] Poles — the idea of keeping them from protecting Jews, [of] seeing Jews as part of this invasive, parasitic, dangerous force that they had to avoid and exterminate.”


German anti-Jewish propaganda: “Jews, lice, typhus.” Poster printed in Warsaw in 1941 and distributed throughout the GG. Courtesy of ŻIH.

nprfreshair:

Arthur Allen's book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl, tells the story of two scientists—one Christian and one Jewish—who battled typhus and sabotaged the Nazis during WWII. 

Transmitted by body lice, typhus killed untold numbers of soldiers and civilians during the war. Today’s interview explores the labor-intensive process of making the vaccine and the way the lab sabotaged the Nazis by weakening their vaccines and sneaking doses into Jewish ghettos. 

Allen explains how the Nazis used lice imagery after they invaded Poland: 

"The Nazis … always described the Jews as "vermin" and sometimes used the word "lice." …And this was an ideology that was belittling and obviously also associating Jews with sort of filth and contamination, parasitism — all of these things that you metaphorically can link lice to.

[The Nazis] made it very concrete after they took over the first Polish cities, that there were signs that went up all over Warsaw, for example … that would have a picture of a bearded Jew with a louse that said, “Lice, Jews, typhus,” to make that association in the minds [of] Poles — the idea of keeping them from protecting Jews, [of] seeing Jews as part of this invasive, parasitic, dangerous force that they had to avoid and exterminate.”

German anti-Jewish propaganda: “Jews, lice, typhus.” Poster printed in Warsaw in 1941 and distributed throughout the GG. Courtesy of ŻIH.

July 19, 2014

l1ttlebulldozer:

I took too many selfies today.
I also tried to do my best impersonations of my brother, since we were in the process of starting to move him out of his apt in RVA.

But at least I got the gold medal in selfie-ing today!

This one. This one is awesome.

10:37pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZbEUNu1Lz2r1m
Filed under: selfie champ 
Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »